Alumni News

20 Questions: Becca Vogt (2010-2013)

by admin on February 22, 2014 Comments Off on 20 Questions: Becca Vogt (2010-2013)


Current Occupation: Graduate Student at University of Miami

Contact Information: rvogt491@gmail.com

Years in Phantom Regiment and Section: 2010, 2011, 2012, Colorguard

1. When did you first see/hear the Regiment?

The first time I saw Regiment live was the summer of 2013. I had never seen a live Phantom Regiment show until after I aged out. I had seen a few videos, with 2006 making the biggest impression in my mind. I saw a clip of the soloist dancer, and I knew that I wanted to be like her someday. The poise, performance, and dedication was beyond anything I had ever seen or experienced. That was the first moment that I fell in love with the PRCG. The next thing I fell in love with was the hornline. I did not know much about DCI in high school, minus a few of my instructors had experienced it before, but when I heard the hornline (through a video even!) perform Spartacus in 2008, I was floored. I could not imagine a more beautiful sound, and I knew that this was the type of music I loved to perform to and experience.   

2. What made you want to march in Regiment?
I wanted to march Regiment because it felt like the right match for how I wanted to grow as a performer. The excellence Regiment always reached made a huge impact in my life, and I knew it would be a privilege to be on the field with those musicians and other color guard members. I knew I would learn so much, and I wanted to push myself and march with the members in white uniforms I had fallen in love with.

3. What is your favorite memory of your time in Regiment?
My favorite memory came from the summer of 2011. I had a rough rookie year in 2010, often feeling like I was not able to fulfill my job and responsibilities to the Regiment. In 2011, I came back knowing that I would push myself as far as I could to set a good example to the new members. The new staff coming in to work with the color guard also helped me see my potential. I was blessed to be on the extended sabre line, my favorite piece of equipment, which was a new challenge for me. I had a new attitude in 2011, and I fell in love with the Regiment all over again. Before Regiment, I had always had some self-doubt and confidence issues, but in 2011 I was pushing to overcome these things. My favorite member came after the Riverside Community College show. The caption head on tour at the time, KC Perkins, called a few of the members to stay after the performance to talk with her. When my turn came, she told me that I was the perfect Phantomette member. I remember being completely shocked, and tears of joy streaming down my face when I walked back to the buses. Though the talk was to encourage me to spend more time perfecting sabre tosses, I could not get past the fact that I was considered a vital part of the Phantom Regiment. Those words will stick with me forever, because that was the pivital part of my Regiment experience. I was a Phantomette.

4. If you could go back and change one thing about your time in the corps what would it be?
I would want to have spent more time getting to know members in 2010. Like I mentioned, my rookie year was difficult for me so I did not expand outside the color guard. In 2011 and 2012, my goal was to meet and know something about every member of the corps. I think I did a good job, but I realize how many individuals I missed out on meeting during my first year. The members of Regiment are such special people, and I wish taken advantage of my time in 2010 to meet those members.

5. What is your all time favorite piece of music that Regiment has played?
Elsa’s Procession to the Cathedral in 2011. Obviously, this is an important piece for Regiment, but having the privilege to perform to this on the field in 2011 made me fall in love with Regiment all over again during every rep. It was such an amazing experience, and I feel so lucky to have been a part of that show.

6. Who do you remember most from your marching days?
My marching days are not too distant from me right now, so I would have to say Kate Chambers, another member of the PRCG. Her rookie year was in 2011, and she became one of my best friends on and off the field. I loved being her friend, watching her grow, and being excited for her future with Regiment. She was a young member in 2011, so she will be aging out in 2016. I love her immensely, and she is one of my favorite people in the world. I also had a close group of friends, mainly from the euphonium section, so people like Dom Villegas, Mark Jenneman, and Kyle Smith are people that I continually look up to for their dedication and passion for the organization and our friendships.

7. Who have you lost track of that you would like to reconnect with?
I would like to hope that I have stayed connected with as many individuals as possible from my marching days, but I know that’s a difficult task. I definitely want to reconnect with our Team Japan friends from 2012, Eri and Marina. At the 2012 banquet, Eri aged out with me. I remember breaking down when she gave me a friendship coin at the banquet, because I realized that the slim likelihood of seeing her again. I try my best to reach out to my Phamily, and I hope to keep my connections for as long as possible. After all, SUTA is a vital part of what we all believe in. 🙂

8. Any favorite stories about Rockford?
One of my favorite moments in Rockford was the first night of move ins during 2011. We were staying in the gym at the time, because the dorms were not ready for us yet. I remember laying down on my air mattress, looking around, and feeling like I had never left. It was a wonderful feeling, being surrounded by wonderful friends and realizing I had the whole summer with them.

9. Did you audition, and if so, what was your audition like?
My audition for the 2010 season was very different than most. I had just graduated high school in 2009, so I auditioned in December of 2010. I was not expecting to make it my first year out of high school, but I decided to go and have the experience and get my name known for the next season. My only goal was to have fun, no restrictions or nerves, because I expected to be cut. On Sunday, they announced the results of the auditions, receiving a Tier 1, 2, or 3. I expected to get cut, so I was surprised and excited when they kept me in the room after they sent those with a Tier 3 to the hallway. I thought it was great that I had gotten a Tier 2, a callback! Two staff members were handing out the sheets, and it became obvious the caption head had the Tier 2 papers and the other staff member had Tier 1s (she was calling all the amazing vets). I was listening mainly to the caption head for my number, but was shocked when I heard the other staff member call my name. When I looked at my sheet, I had been given a spot. I was shocked. It was one of the best moments of my life, one of those times that I couldn’t stop smiling and wanted to cry because I was so shocked, excited, and grateful. It was the start of an amazing experience with Regiment!

10. What is your drum corps history?
I had never seen a live drum corps show before I was in one, (my first was Carolina Crown in the summer of 2010! I was on my way to the restroom after we had performed, and thought I’d go ahead and watch). My drum corps history started and ended with Regiment! 🙂

11. What advice would you give to the kids marching today?
Don’t take a second for granted. It goes by way too fast. Even the bad days are the ones you wish you had a chance to do again, once you cannot do it again. Be confident, and meet everyone you march with! Be sure to know them by name, connect with them in the time you have, because you’ll miss it when it’s done. Keep a positive and optimistic outlook during the hard times. After all, it could always be worse! 🙂

12. Is there one show/performance that sticks out in your memory?
My most memorable performance was finals in 2011. I remember starting Elsa’s on the back sideline, picking up my flag, and just crying. The emotions were real, the magical summer we had was coming to a close, just like Juliet in her story. But it wasn’t tragic like Juliet, it was the perfect performance to end on. I remember my sisters in the back of the field telling me they loved me, SUTA, and everything was perfect. I never felt more a member of the Phamily than at that moment.

13. Do you still find yourself humming parts from a show?
There’s a part in the 2012 opener where the guard is in a block in the middle of the field and there are a few hits we emphasized with our equipment work (sorry for my lack of musical terms or references, but if you watch a video it occurred a few sets before the beheading!). I can’t get it out of my head sometimes!

14. Are you still involved in the music/performing arts field?
I am currently still involved with winter guard, and am starting my first season at Braddock Independent World (Miami, FL). I also have the privilege to teach with the Mandarins this summer, so I am excited to give back to the drum corps activity!

15. What nicknames do you remember?
Backpack! The story behind how I got this nickname was funny. In 2012, we started out spring training with four girls with some variation on the name Rebecca! I had never spun with anybody with my same name before, and it was getting horribly confusing having that many Beccas around! Anyway, we were having a flag technique block, and KC Perkins was on the other side of the block making some corrections and directed a comment towards “Becca,” to which, we obviously had to try to figure out who! Turns out it was for me, and KC yelled from across the field if I had a nickname she could call me, and so I yelled back “Bec Bec,” a nickname Devin Bruen, one of my closest Phantomette sisters, had given me the seasons prior. Of course, she couldn’t hear me from so far away, and thought I said Backpack, and proceeded to call me Backpack for the rest of the block. We figured out the mistake, but it was too late. I will forever be Backpack, and I love it! 🙂

16. Did you have trouble adjusting back to civilian life after the season ended?
I definitely had difficulties adjusting. The hardest thing for me about the transition was losing my best friends due to distance. I know we are in a technological age, and I keep up with Phamily in that way, but it’s not the same as waking up next to your brothers and sisters. The first season was the hardest, and progressively got easier to adjust once I knew what to expect from the transition. Interestingly, I am very curious about this transitional period in drum corps participants lives, and I am writing a research proposal in my graduate studies concerning this aspect of the activity. If anybody is interested in contributing or learning more about this proposal, feel free to contact me with helpful advice or your own stories concerning difficulties in this transitional period between tour and civilian life. 🙂

17. Of your years in Regiment, what year was your favorite?
I mentioned before, but 2011. I believe the transition to an all-female color guard was a great step for the organization and the color guard. As much as I missed my Raiders, I think the summer turned out to be something magical for the entire corps.

18. What was your favorite Regiment tradition?
I don’t think you can ever find something more satisfying than yelling SUTA as loud as you can with your Phamily after a show.

19. What does the Phantom Regiment organization wish it knew about you (what talents, technologies facilities/equipment do you have access to that might be beneficial to PR)?
I am immensely interested in academic research around creative and expressive activities, such as drum corps. If any studies or research would need to be done for any purpose, I definitely have training and experience to design and implement research.

20. Suggestions or comments
Thank you for everything you do! 🙂

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admin20 Questions: Becca Vogt (2010-2013)

20 Questions: Cheryl (McGarrity) Quaine (1987-93)

by admin on February 15, 2014 Comments Off on 20 Questions: Cheryl (McGarrity) Quaine (1987-93)


Current Occupation: Marine Scientist

Years in Phantom Regiment and Section: 1982-86 PR Cadets; 1987-93 PR

1. When did you first see/hear the Regiment?

Around the summer of 1980, my parents took me to the Show of Shows. That fall I went to check out PR Cadets but was too young.

2. What is your favorite memory of your time in Regiment?
In 1986 at the Show of Shows when I was in the PRC, we lined up with side-by-side with PR in finale in a huge arc. As Guard Captain of the PRC I got to stand next to the Guard Captain of the PR, Lynn Blade. I was very excited and thought, I hope I can be Guard Captain of the Phantom Regiment one day too . The memory is still so clear to me.

3. If you could go back and change one thing about your time in the corps what would it be?
I really wish I had taken a moment to be interviewed as an age-out for the video yearbook. I also wished the guard members had taken the time to shake hands with veterans before parades. How incredible would that have been to be surrounded by 28 girls dressed in uniform smiling and saying thanks for your service ? We always took the honor guard very seriously and always noticed them standing to salute during parades. Just wished we had taken it the extra step to have passed out a smile too if we had gotten the chance.   

4. What is your all time favorite piece of music that Regiment has played?
A single piece? Not fair. Amazing Grace and Elsa ‘s are tied for 1st. Fire of Eternal Glory, Goin Home, and Adagio from Spartacus 1982 (I would have sold a vital organ to have marched that in my PR years) are tied for a close 2nd.

5. What do you remember most from your marching days?
Beyer Stadium – pretty sure I still have Beyer Scum embedded in my skin. I ‘m also sure it is going to preserve my body for hundreds of years after I m dead. Local activities like fundraisers (going door-to-door collecting money, car washes, the haunted house), Rockford parades, Beattie Is, Sinnissippi Park.

6. Any interesting or funny bus stories?
Pulling up to the show site to hear the first person yell STADIUM LIIIIIGHTS!!! , trying to French braid hair on the bus (beginning of the season looked pretty scary – sorry Michelle Gately if you have bald spots). And why didn’t the air conditioning ever seem to make to the back of the bus, seriously?

7. Any favorite stories about Rockford?
I remember the Wednesday night Rockford Nucleus rehearsals we used to have. We would rehearse all winter long going over all we learned at the winter camps. This of course, would be changed at the next camp and certainly never resembled what was on the field in August. However, it truly was a great nucleus to the corps and a great way to stay connected.

8. Did you have temporary housing in Rockford while you marched, and if so, do you still have contact with them?
Most of my years I was a Rockfordian but I did stay with the Randazzo s my last couple of years after my parents moved. They were very kind to open up their home to a handful of crazy guard girls.

9. Did you audition? And if so, what was your audition like?
I did audition at the old PR Hall on Latham. It was very intimidating auditioning for the Big Corps . Everyone seemed so tall! It was helpful to have the Wednesday night rehearsals and encouragement from staff that it was time to come up . Still didn’t stop the jitters though!

10. What is your drum corps history?
1982-86 PRC (Guard C.O. 1986), 1987-93 PR (Asst. C.O. 1990, Guard C.O. 1991-93).

11. What advice would you give to the kids marching today?
Take a good hard look at the scoring system and see if it seems subjective or objective to you. If you re on top or you re on the bottom it is the opinion of only a handful of people. That was a hard lesson for me to learn – one that I learned very late in my marching career. My joy came from the crowd, out-performing myself from the previous show, and learning to meld my performance with those around me.

12. Any memorable rehearsal stories?
I was a rookie in PRC, a 4th grader, and so short they had to cut down my flag pole. Phil Weiskircher stopped the corps during a run through and held my feet down to keep me from jumping as I tossed my flag. Funny story now, but I was convinced at the time my life was ruined. Actually, I m still scarred. 🙂

13. Do you still find yourself humming parts from a show?
Christmas time always gets me humming parts of the 1987 Nutcracker/Swan Lake show and don t you know I can still do some of that show in my head! C’ mon Snow Chicks, admit it, you do it too.

14. What staff/support person made the biggest impression on you?
Tony Hall because he came PR after John Brazale. Granted 1992 was not his best effort, but John was legendary and Tony had some big shoes to fill. He did it with grace and confidence and turned out an amazing show. My favorite show.   

15. Are you still involved in the music/performing arts field?
No, I left my last performance in Jackson, MS along with my shoes.

16. Do you ever have drum corps filling a spot dreams?
Ug, yes! It is different every time but revolves around the same idea. I miss a rehearsal and I have to go on the field anyway and just watch the person next to me to figure out the flag work and drill. The stadium lights are so bright and there is usually some sort of Michael Cesario costume change coming up and I have no idea where mine is.

17. What nicknames do you remember?
Soup, Michelle LaRiver, Anna Baboushka, Hedwig, Christuna, Alex, Baby, B and Johnny B .

18. Did you have trouble adjusting back to civilian life after the season ended?
No, the question was always, is there enough hot water for my 2 hour shower by myself? Not a cold shower. Not a fast shower. Not a shower with 50 other people.

19. Of your years in Regiment, what year was your favorite?
1993.

20. What was your favorite Regiment tradition?
1.) In PRC, the guard would stand in a circle, cross arms, and listen to the Greatest Love of All. In PR, the guard would do across the floors and at the end we would do free-form which was a chance to show some personality. Also pre-show the guard would march from the warm-up site to the meet the corps at the gate. My favorite part was starting with a cadence but then letting the soft sound of our feet guide us the rest of the way – completely and perfectly in sync.

2.) Not a tradition, and truly old school, but I loved the elimination boxes we used to do in practice. Staff would walk around and tap you on the shoulder if you made a mistake, leaving one standing at the end. By the end, the commands were really complex running on the diagonal while tossing, step off on the right foot, snap turns, etc. Anything to get someone to slip up. Your mind went silent and Zen.

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admin20 Questions: Cheryl (McGarrity) Quaine (1987-93)

Homecoming Events for 39th Annual Show of Shows

by admin on February 11, 2014 Comments Off on Homecoming Events for 39th Annual Show of Shows

Boylan Stadium in Rockford, Illinois will once again play host to the Phantom Regiment’s Show of Shows on Friday June 20, 2014, part of an exciting weekend of interactive alumni happenings.

Perhaps the most exciting of the events scheduled for that weekend is nicknamed “Project 35: Elsa’s Return to the Cathedral.” This one of a kind performance will take place as part of Phantom Regiment’s encore performance and will include alumni brass players along side the 2014 Phantom Regiment. Thank you goes out to a couple of alums (Terry Pearse & Ray Albert) that helped spearhead this part of the project!

Says Dan Farrell, corps director, “We’re all excited to see this take shape. This will be the first time I’m aware of, that we’ve had an alumni brass section combine forces with the current corps. We’re hoping for a strong showing.”

Other scheduled attractions include opportunities for interaction between corps members and alumni, former staff, volunteers and cadet corps alumni.

To purchase tickets or just sign up www.regiment.org/homecoming

The weekend includes:

Thursday, June 19

  • Show of Shows Kickoff Party, Cliffbreakers Hotel
    • 6p to 11p
    • Open to the public
    • Food & beverage available for purchase
    • View Phantom Regiment memorabilia
    • 50/50 raffles/Silent auction
    • Pick up “Will Call” tickets, name badges and polo shirts
    • Purchase admission in advance to be entered to win a door prize
  • Alumni Hornline First Rehearsal

Friday, June 20

  • Alumni Hornline rehearsal with the Phantom Regiment
  • Lunch with the Phantom Regiment
    • Alumni (& Guests) Only
    • Hosted by Dr. Dan Richardson and Ron Schulz. Sit side by side with a current member & share stories over lunch from the Regiment food truck at Boylan High School
  • Specially designed 2014 S.O.S. Homecoming polo (mandatory for performing alumni)
  • Special “alumni block” seating available with discounted ticket prices
  • BBQ Dinner before the show
  • 39th Annual Show of Shows

Blue Stars, Carolina Crown, Cavaliers

Madison Scouts, Phantom Regiment

Spirit of Atlanta, Troopers, Pioneer,

Colt Cadets

  • Elsa’s Procession to the Cathedral – Featuring Alumni Hornline/Phantom Regiment

ALL alumni who will be attending the Show of Shows are encouraged to RSVP via the Homecoming page link below, whether performing or not. This enables the show committee to make name badges and keep the register current.

This Homecoming page can also be used to buy; specially priced tickets to the Show of Shows, BBQ dinner passes, the commemorative polo, tickets to the kickoff party, tickets to the lunch with the corps and register to perform with the corps.

Cliffbreakers, the host of the Kick Off Party & the official hotel for Show of Shows, also has a block of rooms reserved at a special rate of $79.95/night, for both Thursday and Friday nights. To receive the special rate please call the hotel directly at 815.282.3033 and refer to the “Phantom Regiment Rate”. (Sorry, but online bookings at the hotel will not get this rate.)

Notes to alumni considering participation:

Anyone who has performed competitively in the Phantom Regiment brass section is encouraged to participate. The piece will be conducted by the Regiment’s current conductor, along with the corps’ assistant conductors as well as any past conductors / drum majors that would like to participate. Follow the Homecoming link below to register, gain access to sheet music and receive communications.

The instrumentation will be the same bell-front instruments the corps uses: Bb trumpets, F mellophones, Bb Baritones/Euphoniums and BBb (Contrabass-style) Marching Tubas.

For those looking to rent/borrow a horn if you don’t currently have one in the house, we suggest contacting your local band director (we have already reached out to a few local bands here in Rockford, but haven’t received word back yet, and instruments would be very limited anyway). Additionally, there are some instruments available for rent from local instrument stores but finding anything other than a trumpet is rare.

There will be a rehearsal on Thursday evening prior to the Kick-off Party, as well as a mandatory rehearsal with the corps at 11am Friday morning.

To purchase tickets or just sign up www.regiment.org/homecoming

Booster Club Members

If you’re an annual member of the booster club at a level that comes with a few of the best seats in the house, you’ll still get those tickets if you sign up again for the 2014 Booster Club www.regiment.org/boosterclub. But to receive all the items for alumni homecoming, or just to have your name badge created (alumni only), remember to sign up at www.regiment.org/homecoming

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adminHomecoming Events for 39th Annual Show of Shows

20 Questions: Melissa Ritzman Theodore (1989, 93)

by admin on February 1, 2014 Comments Off on 20 Questions: Melissa Ritzman Theodore (1989, 93)


Current Occupation: Nurse Practitioner

Contact Information: melritz1173@gmail.com

Years in Phantom Regiment and Section: PRC Flugelhorn 1987 & 88, PR Soprano 1989 & 93

1. When did you first see/hear the Regiment?   

I think it must have been sometime in 1985

2. What made you want to march in Regiment?   
I was influenced by Albert Lo and Hope Englin, both PR alumni. Albert was my orchestra teacher at Wilson middle school in Rockford. I think that might have been his first job out of college. Hope was my good friend from class and was Albert s student in PRC as well. They re the ones who got me to my first PRC rehearsal and drum corps show. I wanted to march PRC in 86, but I was 12 and my folks thought I was too young. I finally talked them into it for the 1987 PRC season. I sooooo wanted to be in the color guard.   I can remember Connie Melquist trying to teach me to throw a parallel at the hall on Old River Road. I caught the first one with my face and got a black eye. I already knew how to play the trumpet, so I joined the hornline instead.

3. What is your favorite memory of your time in Regiment?
Show memory has to finals in 1989. It just felt like everything clicked at exactly the right time. I think that we all felt like we could conquer the world after that performance.   

4. If you could go back and change one thing about your time in the corps what would it be?
There were a few tough times, but I learned many great lessons through those tough times. So, I wouldn t change a thing.

5. What is your all time favorite piece of music that Regiment has played?
Toss up between Elsa ‘s Procession and Amazing Grace. I was lucky enough to be a part of the hornline that recorded Amazing Grace in 93. My family has used that recording at more than one funeral. It makes me cry almost every time.   

6. Who have you lost track of that you would like to reconnect with?
Barb Hanovich. She played French horn in 89 and stayed at or house. I have no idea what happened to her.

7. Any interesting or funny bus stories?
I must have slept a lot on the bus, because I can ‘t recall any really funny stories. Lots of dirty songs sung on the drum bus. And I still can ‘t believe that we all just changed clothes on the bus without a second thought. I also can ‘t believe I walked up to the front of the bus on armrests without killing myself. I do remember one time in 89, I was hanging out with some friends from another corps after a show. I didn’t realize it, but the PR was ready to go and had been waiting for me for over 20 minutes, blowing the horn, etc. When I finally got on the bus, Bill DeJournette yelled something at me for the whole bus to hear. I ‘m not going to share it here in the spirit of keeping it clean, but needless to say I do not remember my punishment from Johnny B, but I DO remember how much Bill embarrassed me!

8. Any favorite stories about Rockford?   
I grew up in Rockford. My family had the pleasure of housing PR members even when I wasn’t marching with the corps! Regiment and Rockford back in my day make me think of Beyer Stadium and the corps hall on Old River Road.

9. What skills/experiences from your time in Regiment have you utilized in your current job or life today?
I learned the danger of complacency and if I work hard enough, I can accomplish anything.

10. Did you audition? And if so, what was your audition like?   
The only audition I remember is the audition in 93. One on one with Albert Lo.   I hadn ‘t marched in PR for a number of years by that point and I was VERY nervous!

11. What is your drum corps history?
PRC 1987 & 88, PR 1989 & 93, Limited Edition, Columbus OH 1990 & 91

12. What advice would you give to the kids marching today?
Keep a journal and take lots of pictures!

13. Any memorable rehearsal stories?
I remember a random rehearsal field somewhere that infested with Junebugs. Imagine, bugs the size of grapes bouncing off your legs as you march through the field. Gives me the creeps just thinking about it. I also remember how hot it was during finals week in MS in 93. One day that week, we were tracking the long F scale with Dan. He called us to halt and I was sweating so profusely that it felt like someone was pouring water over my head as I stood there at attention.   

14. Is there one show/performance that sticks out in your memory?
Finals in 89. I also remember the first time we performed the crab step in 93. The crowd just lost it!!!! Was a pretty darn cool moment!

15. What staff/support person made the biggest impression on you, and why?
Dan Farrell. He taught me a very important life lesson that I have never forgotten.   

16. Do you ever have drum corps filling a spot dreams?
Yes, usually in the spring as drum corps season approaches. It s usually some variation of can ‘t find my horn, can ‘t remember the drill type dreams. Funny how that stays with you, isn ‘t it?

17. What nicknames do you remember?
Hotlips, Spanky, Spam, Yam. Mine was Elm.   

18. Did you have trouble adjusting back to civilian life after the season ended?   
Sometimes, I did. In PRC, we traveled in style… on old school buses. We unloaded by just tossing the luggage off the back of the bus. I can remember going on vacation with my family right from DCI in 88. They got REALLY mad at me when I started tossing the luggage around at the airport.   

19. What would you like to see the Regiment do to increase alumni involvement?   
It would be great if the board put out a newsletter like they used to. It used to be on paper, could be digital now. Much cheaper. Makes alumni feel like part of the club! I would also like to see PRAA board members with variety in age and geographic location. Especially since membership is not drawn primarily from Rockford anymore. The alumni hornline event planned for next year is a great way to increase involvement!

20. Of your years in Regiment, what year was your favorite?   
I can ‘t pick from 1989 and 1993!

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admin20 Questions: Melissa Ritzman Theodore (1989, 93)

20 Questions: Walter Strieff (1986)

by admin on January 25, 2014 Comments Off on 20 Questions: Walter Strieff (1986)


Current Occupation: Application Programmer

Years in Phantom Regiment and Section: 1986, Soprano

1. When did you first see/hear the Regiment?   

I think Regiment first grabbed me by the throat at the 1979 DCM. I had probably seen the corps before that, as my Mom had been taking me to shows since age four.

2. What made you want to march in Regiment?   
For me, it was the unique sound of the hornline… and of course, the uniform was pretty cool in my eyes.

3. If you could go back and change one thing about your time in the corps what would it be?   
I wish we had placed better, I know 86 is considered a lost year and I ‘d like that to change.

4. What is your all time favorite piece of music that Regiment has played?   
I’ ll go with the obvious answer… Elsa s, it still starts the waterworks.

5. Who have you lost track of that you would like to reconnect with?   
Amy, the Mello I marched on the field with, and Dennis, the contra in the story below.

6. Any interesting or funny bus stories?
No really good bus stories, but do have some funny tour stories. I have one great story that I still tell today&but if I tell it here Bill Hyde and his mom Pat will be very upset with me. The second best story I have is as follows: For finals week in 86, we stayed in a small town outside Madison, population around 400. The night before finals myself and another ageout, Dennis, a contra from Minnesota, snuck out after curfew to go have an adult beverage at the town watering hole. We had just ordered when one of the half dozen patrons turned his stool around and asked Dennis about his Suncoast Sound t-shirt. Dennis, ever the wordsmith replied, “It s like a marching band… only different. ” The man was intrigued and asked Dennis if he was in the Suncoast Sound and what he played. Dennis responded with “No, I ‘m in the Phantom Regiment and I play contra bass bugle… it’ s like a tuba only different.” Well this guy thought he was on to something so he interrogated Dennis for about twenty minutes. Dennis answered all his questions with his only different answer very graciously. The man was now satisfied and decided to introduce himself, “Thanks for answering all my questions, my name is Bernie. ” At this point I recognized the man as he continued, “Bernie Baggs, ” we ‘d been had, but Dennis didn’t recognize his name. Dennis continued talking with him until I could explain who Bernie Baggs was. Dennis was of course horrified that he just explained all of drum corps to DCI s head brass judge and that he would be judging us the next night. We decided to leave and as we left Bernie said cheerfully, “Go get some sleep, I ll keep this a secret, see you tomorrow! ”

7. Did you have temporary housing in Rockford while you marched, and if so, do you still have contact with them?   
I lived with the Cabello family: Arnie, Ruth, John and John s sister whose name I don t recall. They were a pleasure to stay with, I had my own room and they fed me very well. All they ever asked in return was a few lessons for John. We reconnected on Facebook recently and we ll be getting to together next time I head to Rockford.

8. What skills/experiences from your time in Regiment have you utilized in your current job or life today?   
Of course there are too many to list, but as a programmer I use the ability to stay focused and on task and power through an issue all the time. It ‘s the kind of tenacity I learned in corps that I don ‘t see in other people in the corporate world very often. My wife says she sees a little Regiment in things I do every day and I always tell people I wouldn t be the man I am without Drum Corps and the Regiment.

9. Did you audition? And if so, what was your audition like?   
I did, it was short, I had marched lead sop with the Geneseo Knights in 82 and 83, so when I played about four measures of “Ruslan and Ludmilla”, I had a spot.

10. What is your drum corps history?   
I started out playing Mellophone for LaFlamme Brigade in 1981, that lasted about two weeks when they folded. 82 and 83 I marched lead sop for the Geneseo Knights. Then I took a couple of years off and aged out with Regiment in 86. After that I taught marching with Regiment in the winter of 87. Then I did some work with Mirage, Americanos, and ended my career as a drum corps instructor with Pioneer in 95 and 96.

11. What advice would you give to the kids marching today?   
Enjoy every hot, uncomfortable, stinky, glorious moment you are with the corps. It goes so fast and you ll likely never experience the same kind of intensity and sense of purpose with another group of people.

12. Any memorable rehearsal stories?   
We were somewhere in Massachusetts and had a split rehearsal between the drumline and the hornline and guard. We were working drill with the guard and we could hear the drumline warming up on the other side of the school. Before too long it sounded like they were on the move, which was unusual as they normally didn t start tracking so early in their warmups. It was weird too because you couldn t tell which direction they were going. Of couse we couldn t see them so we had no idea what they were doing. This went on for awhile, it seemed like they were going back and forth from one side of school to the other but not in any kind of logical way. Finally they came around the corner of the school and all was revealed, they were chasing a huge flock of geese!

13. Is there one show/performance that sticks out in your memory?   
Probably the first run for parents in June. I came into the season late and had learned three different spots at the last camp… the performance was horrible for me, I was confused through whole opener, but I got it together and finished strong. I probably need to apologize for some some crash and burns that night.

14. What instructor or member intimidated you the most?   
John Brazale – it was very intimidating to work for a legend.

15. What staff/support person made the biggest impression on you?   
Ron Schulz. I had to leave the corps for a few days in June and he stuck up for me when some staff wanted to cut me for being absent.

16. If you could have marched any other year in Regiment what year would it have been?   
1982, all three Spartacus shows are still among my favorites.

17. Are you still involved in the music/performing arts field?   
Not anymore, I taught and wrote drill until 2002 when my wife and I moved to Clayton N.C. We lived two blocks from the high school, which had a very good marching band. I considered going and volunteering to teach, never did though. I later found out that band consistently places very high at BOA.

18. Do you ever have drum corps filling a spot dreams?   
Many times, I am surprised that I still have it after so many years.

19. What would you like to see the Regiment do to increase alumni involvement?   
I think some alumni performances would be fantastic.

20. What was your favorite Regiment tradition?   
I loved the kick halt, it s just badass.

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admin20 Questions: Walter Strieff (1986)

20 Questions: Mike Gallagher (1956-1959)

by admin on January 18, 2014 Comments Off on 20 Questions: Mike Gallagher (1956-1959)


Current Occupation: Management Consultant (and partially retired!)

Contact Information: celtmg@frontier.com

Years in Phantom Regiment and Section: 1956-59, Drum Section

1. When did you first see/hear the Regiment?   

I was one of the founding members , along with Jim Wren, Dan Richardson, Bob & Keith Stolberg and others from the 1950 s – And yes- those guys are that old also!!!!

2. What made you want to march in Regiment?   
Really wanted to learn to play drums!

3. What is your favorite memory of your time in Regiment?   
Great friends, great learning experience.

4. If you could go back and change one thing about your time in the corps what would it be?   
Would have been great to be a winning corps!

5. What is your all time favorite piece of music that Regiment has played?
Spartacus

6. Who do you remember most from your marching days?   
Must be my wife! We meet during Corps years… and have been married 50 years!

7. Any favorite stories about Rockford?   
In the early days of the Corps it was said that if Rockford planted a new fire hydrant, we would probably play at the dedication . The corps was very visible, and very much a part of the community in its formative years, due to sponsorships and fundraising, etc.

8. What skills/experiences from your time in Regiment have you utilized in your current job or life today?   
I believe learning discipline to accomplish tough tasks is probably one of the lessons learned.

9. Did you audition? And if so, what was your audition like?
In those days recruiting was finding a friend that wanted to try something different – or who played some musical instrument – and wanted to have fun doing something different. In the early years of the Corps, if you had any musical ability/experience, you were the exception!   

10. What is your drum corps history?   
Interesting factoid: Jim Wren and I were the two corps members that recommended the name Phantom Regiment taken from that piece of music, played by Syracuse NY senior corps in about 1954-55. Alex Haddad, the founding director, was very accessible to all of us kids, so we just played it for him, and harassed him that it was classier than Rangers . At the time (the very beginning of the corps) it was started by folks who had been involved with the former VFW and EAGLES club corps, and its first public appearances were under the name Forest City Rangers . This resulted from the competitive color guard which was competing as the corps was formed called the Forest City Rangerettes , and thus came the name Phantomettes!   And yes, my wife was a Phantomette – the first guard sergeant. In later years, on two separate occasions I served on the Board of Directors – the last time being in the Bob Lendman era . There is much more threaded through these 50 plus years, and many friends from its founding days.

11. What advice would you give to the kids marching today?   
Learn, grow, enjoy, and… give back to inexperienced, younger people.

12. What instructor or member intimidated you the most?   
Most memorable – was Alex Haddad the founding director – who also was the drum instructor, horn instructor, drill instructor!!! – until he gradually recruited some young former members of the Rockford corps to assist.

13. How much did it cost for you to march ‘back in the day ?   
Back in the first days, not much – as travel was all very local, and much of the feeding of the corps was done by sponsoring VFW clubs or other groups as part of the appearance fee! There were no membership fees, no travel fees, no audition fees, etc.   Yes! Drum Corps has come from very frugal grassroots!   And, the Phantom Regiment, not unlike the Cavaliers and many other corps who have existed 40 – 50 years, all have roots in American Legion or VFW club beginnings – or in the east many grew out of CYO (Catholic Youth Organizations) organizations. Budgets were often tallied in contributed services, volunteer staff, etc.

14. Have your children followed in your footsteps by marching?
Yes – two daughters were in the Regiment Guard in the 1980 s

15. Do you ever have drum corps filling a spot dreams?   
I admit to wishing I could do it one more time! I even considered joining a local bagpipe band just to be able to play drums again! But didn t.

16. When was the last time you saw a live show?   
2011

17. What would you like to see the Regiment do to increase alumni involvement?   
Perhaps communicate on a more regular, multi-media basis, and possibly create some non corps season events – which should be more social/friendship focused versus just being a fundraiser. Because of alumni living all over the country, it might be interesting to see if a group reunion at some fun site like Disney world, or some other similar tourist destination (i.e. Denver in winter, San Francisco, Phoenix etc. etc.) might work. Many university alumni groups do tours etc. to bring groups together (this also begins to identify alumni with $$$ – for future fundraising)

18. Of your years in Regiment, what year was your favorite?   
All of them – including the years serving on the board – as a means to continue the Regiment ‘s life.

19. What does the Phantom Regiment organization wish it knew about you (what talents, technologies facilities/equipment do you have access to that might be beneficial to PR)?   
Many years of professional management, organizational, consulting, and development of not-for-profit organizations.   

20. Suggestions or comments   
I hope something great comes from this Alumni survey project! Best Wishes!!

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admin20 Questions: Mike Gallagher (1956-1959)

20 Questions: Matt Jenkins (1982-1988)

by admin on January 11, 2014 Comments Off on 20 Questions: Matt Jenkins (1982-1988)


Current Occupation: Teacher

Contact Information: jjwehttam@fuse.net

Years in Phantom Regiment and Section: 1982 1988 Brass Staff

1. When did you first see/hear the Regiment?   

1976 at the Big V show in Milwaukee

2.   What made you want to march in Regiment?
I wanted to instruct the Phantom Regiment because of the corps unique identity and ability to connect with the audience.

3. What is your favorite memory of your time in Regiment?
Fellow brass staff member Kevin Schuessler and I pounding on the walls of a room at the end of the press box during the corps performance at a show in Florida in 1983. The corps was on fire that evening and we were creating such a ruckus that we were distracting the judges in the next room!

4. If you could go back and change one thing about your time in the corps what would it be?
I would drink more beer.

5. What is your all time favorite piece of music that Regiment has played?
Serenade for Strings (Brass) opening of 83 show.

6. Any interesting or funny bus stories?
Returning to Rockford from Green Bay, the staff bus (as I recall some corps members also rode the staff bus in those days) hit an oil slick on the highway and we were fishtailing like crazy! Scared the piss out of me!

7. Any favorite stories about Rockford?
That one waitress at Stash…., oh wait, I can t tell THAT story.

8. What skills/experiences from your time in Regiment have you utilized in your current job or life today?
How to sleep anywhere, anytime. Hey, if you can sleep in an open bus bay (not while the bus was moving, mind you) you can sleep anywhere.

9. Did you audition? And if so, what was your audition like?
I listened to auditions, and you don t want to know what they were like.

10. What is your drum corps history?   
Baritone in Kilties 78 and 79. Baritone in Blue Devils 80. Brass instructor Phantom Regiment 82 88. Brass instructor Star of Indiana 89 93.

11. What advice would you give to the kids marching today?
Get your tour goggles on, baby!

12. Any memorable rehearsal stories?
A visual staff member (I think it was Brazale) encouraging the corps members to keep their capes held out away from their bodies, so they would look like they were streaming in the breeze by repeating the phrase don t break the wind!

13. Is there one show/performance that sticks out in your memory?
1987 US Open. We beat the Blue Devils.

14. Do you still find yourself humming parts from a show?
Hell yeah!

15. How much did it cost for you to march ‘back in the day ?
83 staff had to purchase meal tickets to eat with the corps.

16. Have your children followed in your footsteps by marching?
My son wants to.

17. What nicknames do you remember? Did you have a nickname?
Spanky is the only one that comes to mind. Yes   If so, what was it? One staff member at Phantom and one at Star sometimes referred to me as mattress

18. Did you have trouble adjusting back to civilian life after the season ended?
It ended?

19. Of your years in Regiment, what year was your favorite?
1983

20. What was your favorite Regiment tradition?
The signature halt.

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admin20 Questions: Matt Jenkins (1982-1988)

20 Questions: Kathy Lange Halbrader (1977-1980)

by admin on December 28, 2013 Comments Off on 20 Questions: Kathy Lange Halbrader (1977-1980)


Current Occupation: Homemaker

Years in Phantom Regiment and Section: Color Guard 1977 to 1980

1. When did you first see/hear the Regiment?

My neighbor Tim Mathison came over and asked me if I wanted to join the Phantom Regiment Cadets. I did and stayed he did not stay after two weeks.

2. What is your favorite memory of your time in Regiment?
At the Rockford Show in 1978 when we won. I was standing next to a girl in the Blue Devils, we were knuckle to knuckle. The guy that always drags out the city and name of the drum corps, I can t remember his name, announced them in 2nd place, that just left us. I can remember, and I know it wasn t right, I just couldn t help myself but I snapped my head and looked at her with my most show like look and then presented arms.

3. If you could go back and change one thing about your time in the corps what would it be?
I left when I was 18 because of my job. If I could go back and change anything it would be that jobs come and go but drum corps is a once in a lifetime thing, I would have stayed until I was 21.

4. What is your all time favorite piece of music that Regiment has played?
Flight of the Bumble Bee or Beethoven s 5th

5. Who do you remember most from your marching days?
John Brazale. He was an amazing person and a great instructor.

6. Any interesting or funny bus stories?
Yes. Bus 2 broke down and we all had to ride in the yellow submarine. That was the year I had my appendix out and I had to lay on the floor because of the pain I was having. I still got the pin that said I survived the Yellow Submarine.

7. Any favorite stories about Rockford?
When I was in high school at West High School, I was chosen to be the Drum Major solely on the fact that I marched in the Phantom Regiment. Other kids that marched in the corps but the teacher did not think that he could spare them or they did not want to be the Drum Major. I did not know one thing about music, still I was the Drum Major.

8. What skills/experiences from your time in Regiment have you utilized in your current job or life today?
Time management, it helps me at home because I don t work outside the home.

9. What is your drum corps history?
Just the Cadets and the Phantom Regiment or big corps as we called them. 1974 to 1980.

10. What advice would you give to the kids marching today?
Enjoy every minute because it will be over before you know it. Be nice to everyone you meet and SUTA!!

11. Any memorable rehearsal stories?
It was so hot when we were in Kansas the cones were melting, and even with our shoes on the cement burned our feet, but when we practiced one of the instructors would say stop and get back on the starting line. You could hear a collective $#@& but we all went back to the starting line anyway.

12. If you went on to instruct, what was it like instructing people you had marched with?
I did go on to instruct but the Cadets only. I do know what it is like to instruct my sister though and she really did not listen to me so much.

13. Is there one show/performance that sticks out in your memory?
DCI finals 1978, though I did not march the finals that year we should have won that show because we were the best that year. We only lost by .1.

14. What instructor or member intimidated you the most?
John Brazale

15. Do you still find yourself humming parts from a show?
Yes the end of the show when we used to have a flag pre with the American Flag.

16. What staff/support person made the biggest impression on you? And Why?
Burly Bob Lendman Because he was always there for anyone who asked him for help with their problems or just to talk to.

17. If you could have marched any other year in Regiment what year would it have been?
I don t think I would have wanted to march any other years. I was in the guard when we were called the herd and now the guard dances and all of that. They probably could have done what I had done but I could not have done what they do so gracefully.

18. Did you have trouble adjusting back to civilian life after the season ended?
Yes. I would raise my hand at the dinner table and ask for seconds because that is what we had to do in the corps.

19. Of your years in Regiment, what year was your favorite?
1977 because it was my first year and most exciting.

20. What was your favorite Regiment tradition?
Having the crowds yell SUTA to us while we were on the starting line.

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admin20 Questions: Kathy Lange Halbrader (1977-1980)

20 Questions: Jon de Silva (1982-1983)

by admin on December 21, 2013 Comments Off on 20 Questions: Jon de Silva (1982-1983)


Current Occupation Author of the ebooks “The Curse” and “The Acts of 1 – A Collection of Short Stories”

Contact Information: evilhomer488@yahoo.com

Years in Phantom Regiment and Section: 1982-83 Euphonium

1. When did you first see/hear the Regiment?

At the Rockford WGI contest in February 1978. I was competing in winter guard with Los Comancheros and the Regiment did a standstill, playing Firebird Suite and Rites of Spring. I first saw them compete at DCI Prelims in Boulder, CO that season

2. What made you want to march in Regiment?
I had friends who marched, but it was the opportunity to play Jim Wren’s arrangements and the culture of the Regiment that made me want to march.

3. What is your favorite memory of your time in Regiment?
There are so many good memories, but that’s what happens when you’re part of something special. There are two favorite standstill memories. The first one was when we performed a standstill of the Spartacus show in Jim Wren’s back yard in 1982. He fed us brats afterward. The second was when we did a standstill of the Tchaikovsky show in front of Sue Krause’s house in 1983. Her family fed us as well. I also enjoyed writing the first tour diary in 1983.

4. What is your all time favorite piece of music that Regiment has played?
Elsa’ s Procession to the Cathedral. It was also the last tune I played in a Phantom Regiment uniform.

5. Who do you remember most from your marching days?
Of course, there are my fellow Louisiana Southernaires who marched in the Regiment, especially Southernaire Row on Bus 4, with Brian Dufour, Ray “Spanky” Albert, and Robert Nunez. Some of the others are John Wooten, Curtis Matlin, Tim Marvin, Shawn Allen, Sue Krause, Amy Engelhard, Marisa Aguilar, and Tim & Tina Ambrose.

6. Who have you lost track of that you would like to reconnect with?
There are so many, some of whom I reconnected with already. Some of the names that come to mind are Sue Krause, Robert McCabe, Ken Zahnle, Derek Schumaker, Pete Scheurger, and Tim Marvin.

7. Any interesting or funny bus stories?
Late one night, at the beginning of the second tour of 1983, we were riding through some corn fields in Indiana when the stench of manure wafted into the bus. It was so strong, it woke us all up from a sound sleep. Also, each morning on second tour, when we were on the bus, we had our Morning Moe Latour Greeting: “Good morning. It’s 6:30. Breakfast is now being served. The buses are leaving at 7:15.” One morning, I decided to do an impression of Moe’s greeting and as I started, Moe walked on to the bus. When I finished, he asked, “Who said that?” I sheepishly raised my hand. In typical Moe fashion, he grinned and said, “That was pretty good.”

8. Any favorite stories about Rockford?
When “Return of the Jedi” came out in 1983, the local cinema showed it on two screens. On a free day, the corps members invaded both theaters and watched the matinee showing. In 1982, a few of us were in Cherryvale Mall at the arcade and tried out this new video game called Tron. A local radio station had a Tron contest for free tickets to the movie. We played and had respectable scores, but none of us won anything.

9. What skills/experiences from your time in Regiment have you utilized in your current job or life today?
There are so many, such as leading by example, having a good work ethic, never giving up when times are tough, and others that were listed in previous interviews. In addition to those, I learned that you have to do the little things well in order to do the big things well.   

10. Did you audition? And if so, what was your audition like?
I had an unusual audition. My first camp was the Mother s Day camp in 1982. Kenny Latour and I tried out that weekend. Dan Farrell had us play a bit. He put me on euphonium playing the lead baritone part and he put Kenny on third baritone. Then he gave us a challenge: If we learned the entire show (music and drill) that weekend, we were in. The rest is history.

11. What is your drum corps history?   
Bleu Raeders 1978-80 (Rifle 78-79, Contra 80)
Louisiana Southernaires 1981 (Baritone)
Phantom Regiment 1982-83 (Euphonium)
CorpsVets (now AtlantaCV) 2003-04 (Soprano 03, Baritone 04)
Echoes of New Orleans 2004-05, 2010-present (Soprano 04, Baritone/Euphonium 05, 10-present, Brass Arranger 2007-present, Brass Instructor 2012-present)

12. What advice would you give to the kids marching today?   
Actually, there are three pieces of advice. First, as Steve Suslik taught us, do everything at rehearsal as if it were an actual performance. It s surprising how fast you can get into that mindset and how it carries over into performances. Second, never give up on yourself or your corps brothers and sisters. Everybody wants to win. No matter what happens, when things get tough, you hunker down together and hang tough as a unit. That s what the Think 1 sticker on the back of our helmets was all about. If you re not going to win, then perform at your best and with those performances, make people wonder why you didn t win. Third, and this is for the ageouts, make the most of every moment in the corps. One day, you will no longer be eligible to march in the Regiment. Cherish these days and the people you re with.

13. Any memorable rehearsal stories?
There are two, both from 1982. At the rehearsal before DCI Midwest Finals, we were mad about placing fifth in Prelims andin our last runthrough in half uniforms, we decided to add a little flavor to one of our endings. At the end of “Mourning/Uprising”, there was a two count rest we had just put in. During that rest, we point the horns to the box and then crank the ending. This time during the rest, we yelled in quarter note rhythm, “Eat me!” and finished the tune and runthrough. The staff got a laugh out of that.

14. Is there one show/performance that sticks out in your memory?
Again, there are so many. There are a couple from 1982. The first was when we played “You’ll Never Walk Alone” with the Santa Clara Vanguard and Madison Scouts. There had to be about 200 bugles on the field and we nailed it. The second one was the DCM Runoff. At retreat, when Joe Bruno was announcing the scores and Madison was leaving the field, I thought they were leaving in protest to our winning. A few minutes later, we’re leaving the field. As we left the field, Bruno announced that we tied and there would be a run-off. Both corps were tired from our Prelims and Finals performances that day, but we dug deep and gave it everything we had. Madison went on at midnight and had an emotional and great performance. We went on after them and also had the same kind of performance. The stands were still full and they were cheering everything both corps did. There was a drum majors only retreat and we won.

15. What instructor or member intimidated you the most?
Although it wasn’t fear, there were two instructors with whom I had a healthy respect: Dan Farrell and Steve Suslik.

16. What staff/support person made the biggest impression on you?
Jim Wren. Jim wrote some of the most beautiful drum corps arrangements. He is one of my greatest influences when it comes to arranging tunes. Steve Suslik influenced how I teach marching, with the focus on good execution.

17. Do you ever have drum corps filling a spot dreams?   
Yes, the last one involving the 1983 show.I was asked to fill my old spot and play my old part, even though it had been over 20 years since I aged out.

18. What nicknames do you remember? Did you have a nickname? If so, what was it?
Psycho, Spanky, Nunie, Sucrose, Beaker, and J-I-M Jim Wren. Yes, In the Bleu Raeders and Louisiana Southernaires, it was Hit Man. In the Regiment, it was Jon de Precious Metals (Courtesy of Pete Scheurger).

19. Of your years in Regiment, what year was your favorite?
As much as I loved the 1982 Spartacus show, my favorite year was 1983. It’s not because of the show, but because of the people who were a part of it. When things got tough, especially on second tour when we realized there was no way we were going to win, instead of pointing fingers or calling people out, we looked to and supported each other. To this day, I have never been as proud to be associated with a group of people

20. What was your favorite Regiment tradition?
All of them (okay, maybe not the receiving end of initiation). I really enjoyed marching on to the field with our arms across our faces and our capes hanging in front of us, where you could only see our eyes between the capes and helmets.

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admin20 Questions: Jon de Silva (1982-1983)

20 Questions: Jen Arnst (1988)

by admin on December 14, 2013 Comments Off on 20 Questions: Jen Arnst (1988)


Current Occupation: School Guidance Counselor

Contact Information: jenarnst@hotmail.com, Jen Arnst on Facebook

Years in Phantom Regiment and Section: 1 year-1988 Soprano

1. When did you first see/hear the Regiment?

Yikes-maybe 1983?

2. What made you want to march in Regiment?
I was a music major in college. I wanted to march in a corps with a tradition of playing classical repertoire.

3. What is your favorite memory of your time in Regiment?
DCI East finals-Allentown and Finals in Kansas City.

4. If you could go back and change one thing about your time in the corps what would it be?
I wish I would have had the funds to march two seasons. I would have done one in the color guard and one in the horn line.

5. What is your all time favorite piece of music that Regiment has played?   
I actually really like the music from 88. Of course I love New World Symphony but Romeo and Juliet has a special place in my heart.

6. Who do you remember most from your marching days?
Mike Sloan-we used to sneak flags off the equipment truck and spin when we had down time. Chad Causey-because he was hilarious and a good friend. Adrienne Holt-what a sweetheart. Carissa Shannon-fabulous guard friend. Christine Sowrey- a good friend closer to my age (21 at the time!). There are just too many to mention

7. Did you have temporary housing in Rockford while you marched, and if so, do you still have contact with them?
I was fortunate enough to stay with Dave and Nancy St. Angel. Kevin marched and Stephanie helped with the boosters. They were a PHABULOUS host family! I also had a corps dog, Dozer, while I was there which was great because I was homesick for my own dog.

8. What skills/experiences from your time in Regiment have you utilized in your current job or life today?
Determination and the reminder that if I could make it through pushing myself that hot, dry summer, I can still accomplish anything, no matter how challenging!

9. Did you audition? And if so, what was your audition like?
Funny story, I auditioned for the guard initially. I was very torn and concerned I would not get a spot as I had only been spinning for a few years and also had conflicts with camps due to my participation in a WGI guard. I was also in the process of deciding if I was going to change my major from music to counseling. So, I jumped in the horn line at winter camp and ended up staying there. I don t think I had to audition for my horn spot. I am really glad I had the opportunity to play in that horn line.

10. What is your drum corps history?
I started in an all age corps called the Archer-Epler Muskateers, out of Philadelphia, when I was 15 years old. My high school band director thought I might like it. I spent one year in the horn line and one year in the guard. I took time off to start college and work. In 1987 I marched in another all age corps called the Westshoremen, out of Harrisburg, PA. I marched in the guard.

11. What advice would you give to the kids marching today?
If you have the slightest idea that you might want to march in a DCI corps, do it! You will not regret it. I have plenty of peers who never did and wish they had.

12. Is there one show/performance that sticks out in your memory?   
My spot was changed a few days before the first show. I was filling a hole for someone who quit. All was great until the evening when we were in uniform and I realized that EVERYONE looked exactly the same from the back. It made our many pass throughs a little scary that night.

13. What instructor or member intimidated you the most?   
John Brazale

14. What staff/support person made the biggest impression on you?
Mark Waymire. He was my marching tech. He was very patient and helpful.

15. If you could have marched any other year in Regiment what year would it have been?
1989

16. Do you still find yourself humming parts from a show?
Absolutely!

17. Are you still involved in the music/performing arts field?
Yes-I have been teaching marching band (color guard) since 1985. I also teach indoor guard. I currently teach Field of View Winter Guard out of West Chester, PA.

18. What nicknames do you remember?
Cobra-Alan Pechman

19. Did you have trouble adjusting back to civilian life after the season ended?
Re-entry into the real world was rough. I returned from tour and was at band camp at West Chester University two days later-but spinning a rifle, after not spinning all summer! My car died after the trip back from Rockford and not having worked all summer left me with no money to fix or replace it. Luckily a friend had a car he sold me for cheap!

20. What would you like to see the Regiment do to increase alumni involvement?
Because I live so far away I m not sure. I live close to the Cadets organization and they seem to do things with and for alumni pretty much throughout the year. I don t know if that is possible for Regiment or not or if it occurs and I am just too far to take advantage of things.

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admin20 Questions: Jen Arnst (1988)